ADOPT A RHINO

There are five species of rhino. Black and white rhinos live in grassland plains and savannah woodland in Africa. The Javan, Sumatran and Indian rhinos are found in Asia and live in tropical forests and swamps. 

Rhinos are characterised by their large size and can weigh more than a tonne. They can have one or two horns, and their thick skin is made of collagen and arranged in a lattice structure. Their brains are small relative to their body size. Rhinos belong to the group Perissodactyls, or odd-toed ungulates, which also includes horses and tapirs. A group of rhinos is called a crash.

Several threats are edging rhinos closer to extinction. The continuing issue of illegal hunting and poaching for their horns, which are used in traditional Asian medicine, mean that rhino numbers have fallen dramatically. 

WHAT'S INCLUDED IN YOUR RHINO ADOPTION

Help protect rhinos in the wild with an animal adoption, and you'll receive an exclusive adoption pack containing a soft toy, animal story, species factsheet, personalised certificate and glossy photo. Plus, we’ll send you our Adopt magazine twice a year with updates on all our animal adoptions – perfect for animal lovers.

Adoptions last one year (those paid by monthly direct debit roll over until cancelled).

 

ISSUES AFFECTING RHINOS TODAY

In spite of years of campaigning, poaching for rhino horn is still a major issue affecting rhinos today. Rhino horn is still sold illegally in markets in parts of Asia, where it’s used in traditional medicines and as high-end gifts. The poachers don’t care about the welfare of the animals, and many rhinos are left to suffer and die after their horns have been cut off. Baby rhinos are sometimes killed for their horn stubs, or can be left orphaned and starving.

Despite the fact that rhino horn consists largely of keratin, like human finger nails, the huge prices being paid in Asian markets has led to smuggling under the pretence of trophy hunting in South Africa. Theft of horns from museums, galleries and even zoos is becoming more commonplace. There is also an increased interest in antique items made from, or containing rhino horn, particularly among Asian buyers.

Rhinos are also under threat from loss of habitat caused by human encroachment and agricultural development. When land is severely fragmented, populations become smaller and more isolated, which limits breeding opportunity. Small populations, such as the Javan rhino, are more vulnerable to catastrophic events such as tsunamis or volcanic eruptions, which can then wipe out all individuals. 

ADOPTING A RHINO WILL HAVE A MASSIVE IMPACT

Funds from your adoption will support our work in Meru National Park, Kenya. 

Meru was a haven for wildlife and where Elsa the lioness, star of the book and film Born Free, was released into the wild. However, in the 1980s, Meru was overrun by poachers and its wildlife decimated, including all of its rhino. In the early 2000s, Kenya Wildlife Service launched a programme to restore Meru’s wildlife to its former glory.

This included creating a rhino sanctuary to protect and encourage a healthy rhino population in the park. Born Free supports the rhino sanctuary by funding vital equipment for the sanctuary’s rhino rangers, which supports both its vital work and ranger welfare.

It seems to me that the natural world is the greatest source of excitement; the greatest source of visual beauty, the greatest source of intellectual interest. It is the greatest source of so much in life that makes life worth living.Sir David Attenborough

Your money will help:

Protect rhinos in Meru National Park, Kenya

Fund vital equipment for the sanctuary’s rhino rangers

Lobby governments and campaign against trophy hunting and the rhino horn trade

 
ADOPT NOW

ADOPT THE RHINO FAMILY

In the 1980s, Meru National Park saw a catastrophic loss of wildlife at the hands of poachers, including all of its rhino. By adopting our rhino family, you will help us to protect and encourage a healthy rhino population back in the park.

Your adoption will help provide the protection they need

To change to your preferred currency please use the currency option at the top of the page. Please note this is for display purposes only and your bank may offer a different exchange rate.

ADOPTION PACK DELIVERY INFORMATION

We will process and send your order within 3 working days, and would normally expect it to arrive within 7 working days to addresses within the UK. All UK orders are sent via Royal Mail 2nd class delivery. Please allow 28 days for delivery on overseas orders. Please note – we cannot hold orders for delivery on a specific date.

Orders do not need to be signed for, but if you have requested the optional toy, the box won’t fit through the letterbox so you will need to be available to accept the delivery. A card will be left if you’re unavailable.

ADOPTING A RHINO AS A GIFT? 

The adoption certificate can be personalised with the name of your choice, and delivery arranged to a separate address.

NEED HELP WITH YOUR RHINO ADOPTION?

Call our customer support team on 01403 240170.

MORE ANIMALS THAT NEED YOUR HELP...

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