A FUTURE FOR TIGERS

Tigers face many threats to their survival in the wild, but despite these threats, Born Free remains optimistic for the future of tigers in the Satpuda landscape of central India, says Born Free's Beth Brooks

Over the last three months, we’ve told you all about the work of our Living with Tigers programme. 

Tigers face many threats to their survival in the wild, but despite these threats, Born Free remains optimistic for the future of tigers in the Satpuda landscape of central India.

Why? Because Living with Tigers is making progress. In the last 10 years, tiger numbers have increased to 500 across the Satpuda. It is hard, committed and long-term work, but we are working with local communities on compassionate and considerate initiatives that help them live peacefully alongside tigers.

To mitigate human-wildlife conflict, we’ve introduced toilets in more than 200 villages, bio-gas plants in more than 1,000 homes, and captured eight poachers thanks to information provided through our Mobile Health Unit

Nearly 30 women have been trained and are now employed as tourist guides. 10 men are employed at a bamboo workshop, and 10 women’s groups have started their own micro-businesses.

With your help, and your generous support throughout our campaign, we plan to work with more local communities to reduce human-wildlife conflict, and educate more people on the importance of conservation and co-existence.

“We have identified a lot of livelihood alternatives and options and I like to see that the community is getting their livelihood from alternative resources and alternative livelihood projects like tourism and hospitality management,” says Kishor Rithe, Founder of Living with Tigers partner Satpuda Foundation.

It’s not just the local communities that Living with Tigers is looking after – we are also ensuring tigers have protected areas across central India so that they can roam freely in their natural habitat.

“Our landscape enjoys a lot of protection,” says Poonam Dhanwatey, Co-Founder of Living with Tigers partner Tiger Research and Conservation Trust (TRACT). “Our management and our state government has put in a lot of effort. There is a lot of funding which is going in and our policies are really good. So, I think with the effort of NGOs like us, local people and the government, we do see a very positive trend.”

TRACT Co-Founder Harshawardhan Dhanwatey adds: “A lot of our forests remain protected and the government has declared other areas as wildlife sanctuaries, tiger reserves or buffers. So I can see a very bright future for tigers here, and I can see that tigers will remain forever.”

LIVING WITH TIGERS

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