ETHIOPIAN WOLVES

CANIS SIMENSIS

The Ethiopian wolf is the world’s rarest canid, and a close relative of grey wolves and coyotes that colonized the Horn of Africa through land bridges. Ethiopian wolves are only found on the highlands of Ethiopia and are Africa’s most threatened carnivore.  

Slender and long-legged with a distinctive red-tinged coat and bushy tail, the Ethiopian wolf’s narrow muzzle and widely-spaced small teeth help to handle small prey which they stalk out in the open or dig from their burrows. 

Ethiopian wolves live in close-knit territorial packs of up to 18 adults, with a strong hierarchy.  They congregate for social greetings and territory patrols at dawn, midday and in the evening and rest together at night.  

Packs are typically an extended family group, and members will assist in caring for the pups, helping to feed and protect them. Male wolves rarely leave their natal pack, whereas some young females may leave to look for breeding opportunities elsewhere.

The dominant female in each pack breeds once a year, typically during the dry season (October to February), and after a two-month gestation a litter of two to seven pups is born in a den. In order to avoid inbreeding the dominant female will only mate with the dominant male of the pack, and will also be receptive to approaches by males from neighbouring packs.

*International Union for Conservation of Nature is the world’s main authority on the conservation status of species

  • IUCN* STATUS

    Endangered

  • POPULATION

    Fewer than 500 ⬇️

  • DIET

    Feed almost exclusively on small rodents, like the giant mole rat and grass rats, occasionally killing hares, hyraxes of antelope calves

  • HABITAT

    Afroalpine open grasslands and moorlands

  • LOCATION

    Half a dozen mountain ranges in the Ethiopian highlands at altitudes above 3,000m and up to 4,700m, with over half of the global population found in the Bale Mountains

ISSUES

Ethiopian wolves are threatened by loss of habitat due to high-altitude subsistence agriculture and overgrazing by domestic livestock. But most immediately by lethal diseases carried by domestic dogs such as rabies and canine distemper.


Road kills, persecution, and hybridisation through breeding with domestic dogs are also a concern.

OUR WORK

Urgent efforts are needed to ensure the survival of the endangered Ethiopian wolf, the rarest canid and one of the rarest carnivores on earth.

WE RAISE FUNDS TO SUPPORT . . .

 

FIELD CONSERVATION

The Ethiopian Wolf Conservation Programme (EWCP) was established by Born Free as a long-term partnership with Ethiopia and WildCRU at the University of Oxford.

Through EWCP we support conservation, monitoring and management of Ethiopian wolves and the Afroalpine habitat, along with disease prevention and control through vaccination campaigns.

THE ETHIOPIAN WOLF CONSERVATION PROGRAMME

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