Born Free Foundation - Keep Wildlife in the Wild

Big Cat Diary July 2016

Jean Byrd Center Blog

July 2016

Written by Headman Matyumza and Kelvin Buys, 

Animal Care Assistants

Headman removing bones from the camps

Headman removing bones from the camps

Hello everyone, warm greetings from us and from the cats at the Jean Byrd Center. We are all doing very good here. We have a few more visitors coming to see us now, the numbers are picking up, and they all seem to appreciate what we are doing.  We try our best to promote the work of the Born Free Foundation, and excite our guests on what can be achieved, protecting wild animal in the wild, and rescuing cats from sad circumstances.  Some of our visitors have asked about Kuma, who died last month, a grand old leopard gentleman of 20 years.  We haven’t had any students visiting us in July, but we expect them next month. 

We experienced a few rains this month and the vegetation is turning green and our garden looks beautiful and green. The center and camps are in good condition. We make sure the camps are clean, picking up bones and faeces and making sure the cats have clean, fresh water.  If there is something needed doing at our Julie Ward Center we go and assist.

UPDATES ON OUR RESCUED CATS

SHADA, RESCUED FROM A FRENCH CIRCUS IN NOVEMBER 2006

Shada the lioness

Shada

Shada is doing excellently, and we see her every day, sometimes at her favorite spot by the bottom fence line or on the roof of her shelter in the main camp. She doesn’t choose to use the hospital camp much; the only times she is in there is on feed days or the vet is coming to check up on her. Some good associations, some bad!  Our visitors can’t believe that she is turning 20 years now; she is in such good condition. She is taking her food very well and drinks well.  The big girl is still active and we don’t have any concern about her health.

LEDA AND HER DAUGHTER RHEA

RESCUED FROM LIMASSOL ZOO IN CYPRUS IN JUNE 2009

Leda the leopard

Leda

Both Cyprus leopards are doing very good and they taking their food as usual.

Mum Leda is using both camps. In the morning she likes to be in the hospital camp chilling on top of her shelter / sometimes just in front of the viewing deck behind the bushes.  Yah, she is old but she’s still active. In the afternoon she likes to relax on top of her platform, minding her business. She is more comfortable around visitors.

Rhea, she is also using both camps but she prefers the hospital camp. At feeding time, she eats her food in the main camp and once she is done she will come and relax or play in the hospital camp. 

Rhea the leopard

Rhea in her hospital camp

BLACK AND JORA

REHOMED FROM A CIRCUS IN BULGARIA WHEN WILD ANIMALS IN CIRCUSES BECAME ILLEGAL.  ARRIVED SHAMWARI SEPTEMBER 2015

The brothers are doing great and they take their food very well and eat it all. They are always together, there is no bad vibes between them at all, they really love each other, and can often be seen sitting together and grooming each other. What I notice is that Jora is missing his neighbor Kuma because some time you will find him sitting close to the release gate looking at Kuma’s camp. They are quite active. Some mornings we will find them roaring, moving up and up and down and they spend most of their time in the main enclosure unless we clean the main camp, (the bones and faeces) and give them the fresh water, then we make sure they are in the hospital camp. The boys are visible to the guests and the guests they don’t want to lose sight of them.  

Black the lion
Black
Jora the lion
Jora
Born Free Foundation
Broadlands Business Campus, Langhurstwood Road
, Horsham, RH12 4QP, UK - Charity Reg. No. 1070906


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